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Latest News & Events Category: Blogging (4 posts)


Morley Hayes | 31st October 2019 | News at Morley Hayes
With autumn in full swing and Halloween on the horizon, it’s officially apple harvest season again, which can only mean one thing – the return of Toffee Apples!   Most people attribute the creation of toffee apples to American confectionary expert William W. Kolb back in 1908. Legend has it that he was experimenting with red cinnamon Christmas candy when he dipped a few apples for his window display that caught the interest of passing customers. He sold his first batch for 5 cents a piece and the craze took off until he was selling thousands every year and toffee apples found themselves all across the country!   Others believe that toffee apples have routes far beyond William W. Kolb and his sweet shop. There’s a theory that the technique originated from Arabian households as a way to preserve their fruit - or even Ancient Egypt where they would coat their fruit and nuts in honey to preserve them for the gods (and because it tasted great!)   Whatever the history, toffee apples have had a massive impact all around the world. In Brazil they’re called maçã-do-amor and in France the sweet treats are named pommes d’amour - both of which mean ‘Apples of Love’.   Over in Germany toffee apples are most often associated with the Christmas season and are sold at carnivals, fairs and markets throughout the festive period.   And of course, in the UK and USA we pay close attention to the delicious treat during the Halloween period – National Candy Apple Day even falls on October 31!   The love of toffee apples doesn’t stop in Europe either. In Israel they’re sold in city squares on Yom Ha’atzmaut Eve (Israel Independence Day) as part of street celebrations. People go all out in Japan and China, covering an array of fruits in candy-coating which are sold at festivals throughout the year.   There’s no shortage of love for toffee apples wherever you go,but be sure to create these sweet treats with Fuji or Granny Smith apples – the ta...

Morley Hayes | 10th August 2018 | News at Morley Hayes
It’s summer, and for most of us Brits, that only means one thing – barbeque time. With 2018 proving to be one of the hottest in years, we’ve probably consumed more burnt burgers than ever before. So, with the heatwave looking like its here to stay, we’ve compiled some ideas to jazz up your BBQ offering and really wow your guests this August Bank Holiday.   Let’s start with the classic BBQ staple – the burger. There are endless ways to create your perfect burger and of course, a multitude of possible fillings. At Morley Hayes, we believe there’s no better burger meat than beef. We like ours with melted cheddar cheese, fried onions and ketchup – simple but effective.    No barbeque is complete without a yummy kebab. The world’s your oyster when it comes to combinations, but you can’t go wrong with a simple lamb and mint kofta. Other kebab recipes include lamb with plum sauce and served with sour cream, or a honey-glazed pork and pineapple skewer that the kids will love.   A meaty BBQ nightmare is a thing of the past for the modern-day vegetarian, with more veggie recipes available now than ever before. Our favourites include delicious halloumi, tomato and aubergine skewers. Drizzle in olive oil and serve on warm crusty bread and you’ve got a dish for any time of the year.   There are a range of decent veggie burgers available in all supermarkets for a quick and easy meat-free alternative. But if you’d like to make your own, we recommend mushrooms, butter beans, sweet potato and pepper, along with avocado, as some of the best veggie burger ingredients.     For the sides, why not mix it up and change chips to sweet potato fries, a healthier alternative, cooked in the oven first and then smoked on the barbeque. Or, try some delicious miniature new potatoes or keep it simple with a corn on the cob, charred and dripping with butter.   If you’d rather not risk another burnt sausage or need a break from the BBQ, pop down to the M...

Morley Hayes | 11th July 2018 | News at Morley Hayes
With England through to a World Cup semi-final for the first time in 28 years, football fever has well and truly swept the nation. And, since it’s being held in Russia this year, we thought we’d join in the fun by focusing on traditional Russian cuisine. Why not experiment and serve some of these authentic dishes at your next World Cup party? After all, they only come around once every four years!   Russia is a massive and hugely diverse country and as a result, so is its cuisine. Food varies from city to city and takes influences from Northern and Eastern Europe, Central Asia, Siberia and East Asia.    Here are just three Russian dishes you’d have to try if visiting the country, or that you could even make at home.   When temperatures in Russia drop (and they do, temperatures can drop to -30°C during winter in Moscow), a typical warming beet soup, or borscht, might do the trick. This delicious dish is served with or without meat, potato, herbs (usually dill) and a dollop of smetana, Russian sour cream.   Another popular dish is pelmeni, Russia’s take on dumplings. They are usually made from thin, unleavened dough and filled with minced meat, onions, mushrooms, and sometimes, turnip. They can be served alone, in butter and topped with sour cream, or in a soup broth.   Arguably one of Russia’s most famous foods, blini, Russia's version of the thin French crêpe, are a staple on most Moscovian menus. Typically made with buckwheat for savoury fillings or white flour for sweet toppings, blini are such an important part of Russian cuisine that a festival called Maslenitsa celebrates the beginning of spring with them.   If these Russian recipes don’t take your fancy, or, if you’d rather let someone else handle the cooking, come and visit Morley Hayes and enjoy some good English fayre. We’re showing all of England’s games live on the big screen in Spike Bar, so you can come and roar on The Three Lions with us while you enjoy ...

Morley Hayes | 15th June 2018 | News at Morley Hayes
With summer on its way and the sunshine looking like it’s here to stay (for now at least), we thought we’d celebrate the best British summer fruit there is – the strawberry. Put them in your Pimm’s, smother them in cream, make a yummy jam, or top your scones with them - when it comes to using this tasty and hugely versatile fruit, the possibilities are endless! British Strawberries really are the best in the world. They're in season from early May and if the good weather continues from July they’ll be around until the end of September. They’re full of health benefits too – did you know that a handful of strawberries contains more vitamin C than an entire orange? Strawberries were cultivated by the Romans as early as 200 BC. In medieval times, strawberries were regarded as an aphrodisiac and soup made of strawberries, borage (also known as starflower) and soured cream was traditionally served to newly-weds at their wedding breakfast. Strawberries were also used to treat digestive ailments, discoloured teeth and skin irritations. With a long season and an excellent taste, Elsanta is still the most popular British strawberry. Look out for Sweet Eve and Eve’s Delight too, which are both high in natural sugar and have a pleasant perfumed aroma. Other varieties include English Rose, known for its orange zest flavour and Jubilee. Here at the Dovecote, we use the unique flavours and textures of strawberries in our own special way. We’re always coming up with new ideas and recipes to showcase the great British strawberry - from jams, compotes and sorbets to jellies and mouth-watering meringues. So, make the most of the strawberry season and give your taste buds a dose of the Great British summer! If you want to have a go at making your own strawberry-centric delights at home, check out some of our favourite strawberry recipes from around the web: Start with the basics, learn how to make strawberry jam - https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/gui...